Immediate seating available

Posted January 19th, 2012 by kcorliss. Comment (0).

Of all the avian visitors which tend to frequent the backyard feeders of us urban dwellers, perhaps the most unwelcome–at least in the hearts of most–are the small group of woodland hawks in the family Accipitridae. Within this small three-species group (in North America) easily the most common to appear near your bird feeders is the sharp-shinned hawk, at least in winter. (I’m speaking strictly for our immediate area of the southern Red River Valley).

Come summer sharpies disappear to be replaced by their larger cousins, Cooper’s hawks. The third family members–Northern goshawks–are very rare in our local urban area and not even worth mentioning at the moment.

So it was with a degree of surprise that I happened to look out the kitchen window yesterday to see a first-year female Cooper’s hawk throwing herself around in an effort to catch a house sparrow. Twenty minutes of effort produced nothing for her however. Looking at the photo at right, I would only offer one small critique for this bird: You might want to disguise your intent a little better…

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>